Intrensic CEO’s message: U.S. Army Halts Use of DJI Drones Over Cyber Concerns

This past week, the U.S. Army has ordered its members to stop using drones made by Chinese manufacturer SZ DJI Technology Co Ltd because of “cyber vulnerabilities” in the products.  On August 2, 2017, Army memo posted online and verified by major news agencies applies to all DJI drones and systems that use DJI components or software. It requires service members to “cease all use, uninstall all DJI applications, remove all batteries/storage media and secure equipment for follow-on direction.”

This mandate directly follows the message we have been outlining to municipal law enforcement, public safety first responders, state services, and well as federal agencies over the past several months.  Our primary concerns regarding the automatic flight-log tracking of the DJI units as well as classified information being stored on highly susceptible foreign servers has been recognized by the U. S. Government at the highest level.  Blacklisting of DJI drones follows studies conducted by the Army Research Laboratory and the Navy that said there were “risks and vulnerabilities” in DJI products.

DJI said in a statement that it was “surprised and disappointed” at the Army’s “unprompted restriction on DJI drones as we were not consulted during their decision.”  We were not surprised and were one of the first companies to identify this debarring issue.

As we move forward in our marketing of the GoPro Karma drone and our Intrensic platform, it gratifies me to report that agencies now have the ability to cancel flight tracking and secure their data in our compliant Intrensic software and storage solution.  GoPro provides a dynamic drone with the Karma.  The unit is portable, easy to fly, and utilizes GoPro’s industry leading camera technology.  Our Intrensic digital data management system is a secure and cost-effective means to easily off-load data in a mobile transport or site facility without undue vulnerabilities.

For more information, please reach out to any member of the Intrensic team.

 

Kevin Mullins, CEO

Likes0 Comments2 Minutes


DID YOU KNOW? Location Based Evidence Gathering

The location of evidence gathered is important, searchable and helps with analytics.
The location of evidence gathered is important, searchable and helps with analytics.

In a piece of Evidence, the user can now add the location of their recordings.

In some cases the location may already be present because of the camera’s GPS activation OR our integration with your agency’s CAD system.  Either way, having location data is valuable when running reports, searching for video at a specific location and even analytics.  One of our next releases will include the ability to draw a GEO fence around a location and see all of the recordings in that designated area.

Location Based Evidence Gathering is also a great tool when used in conjunction with our Karma UAV.

Find Out More

Likes0 Comments1 Minute


Intrensic User’s Group

intrensic gopro

Welcome to the Intrensic User’s Group. Our support and development team will send out routine emails to our Body Worn Camera users that includes exciting new features, tips for easy navigation and solicitations for future developments. We appreciate your feedback and we are always here to help.  To stay in the loop, submit the form below:

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required

Likes0 Comments3 Minutes


Body Camera Reporting, Auditing Features Push Intrensic to the Forefront

Washington, DC, May 3, 2017 (Newswire) –As Intrensic closes the gap on its development of both a Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) and a Records Management (RMS) platform, a newly released feature in their Digital Evidence Management System (DEMS) has catapulted them ahead of the competition.

With terabytes of video uploaded to the cloud in only months, the ability to audit a body camera program is essential. While Intrensic has arguably the most detailed audit trail in the business by capturing every file touch down to the IP address, date and time is just not enough.

“We saw the need to create a report that would allow a patrol supervisor or body camera program manager to audit video uploads versus an officer’s number of calls,” said Director of Product Development Kevin AngellAngell said he realized the need for the report when presenting at a national conference to community organizations and special interests groups.

Following that meeting, Angell met with CEO Kevin Mullins and discussed the creation of an Upload Audit Report (UAR). The report would be able to be run by supervisors daily, weekly, monthly or on a customized set of dates. It would include the number of uploads on a specific date and could be exported as a PDF report.

“We knew that with the UAR in hand, a supervisor could call dispatch or run a call log and ensure the integrity of their program by comparing uploads to calls,” said Mullins.  Mullins immediately sent the feature to the development team for research.

The UAR is not the only reporting feature developed during the recent roll-out, but Mullins held his cards close. When pressed Mullins said, “Crime reporting to the FBI, predictive patrolling and grant reporting were as important to us as they were to our clients.”

The Bureau of Justice Assistance (Washington, DC), their Body Worn Camera toolkit and the Training and Technical Assistance (TTA) program provide some additional insight into the future needs of agencies and body-worn camera programs. Angell remarked that he is in a constant “read and research mode” to ensure that Intrensic stays ahead of the curve. “We really hit the ball out of the park this time,” he said. “I am not aware of any other body-worn camera provider with such a report,” he added, referring to the UAR.

Once the CAD and RMS platforms roll out later this year, the UAR will go hand in hand with several other reports, thereby freeing up officers to engage the community and build relationships.

Likes0 Comments3 Minutes


Intrensic CEO’s message: U.S. Army Halts Use of DJI Drones Over Cyber Concerns

August 8,2017

This past week, the U.S. Army has ordered its members to stop using drones made by Chinese manufacturer SZ DJI Technology Co Ltd because of “cyber vulnerabilities” in the products.  On August 2, 2017, Army memo posted online and verified by major news agencies applies to all DJI drones and systems that use DJI components or software. It requires service members to “cease all use, uninstall all DJI applications, remove all batteries/storage media and secure equipment for follow-on direction.”

This mandate directly follows the message we have been outlining to municipal law enforcement, public safety first responders, state services, and well as federal agencies over the past several months.  Our primary concerns regarding the automatic flight-log tracking of the DJI units as well as classified information being stored on highly susceptible foreign servers has been recognized by the U. S. Government at the highest level.  Blacklisting of DJI drones follows studies conducted by the Army Research Laboratory and the Navy that said there were “risks and vulnerabilities” in DJI products.

DJI said in a statement that it was “surprised and disappointed” at the Army’s “unprompted restriction on DJI drones as we were not consulted during their decision.”  We were not surprised and were one of the first companies to identify this debarring issue.

As we move forward in our marketing of the GoPro Karma drone and our Intrensic platform, it gratifies me to report that agencies now have the ability to cancel flight tracking and secure their data in our compliant Intrensic software and storage solution.  GoPro provides a dynamic drone with the Karma.  The unit is portable, easy to fly, and utilizes GoPro’s industry leading camera technology.  Our Intrensic digital data management system is a secure and cost-effective means to easily off-load data in a mobile transport or site facility without undue vulnerabilities.

For more information, please reach out to any member of the Intrensic team.

 

Kevin Mullins, CEO



DID YOU KNOW? Location Based Evidence Gathering

August 2,2017
The location of evidence gathered is important, searchable and helps with analytics.
The location of evidence gathered is important, searchable and helps with analytics.

In a piece of Evidence, the user can now add the location of their recordings.

In some cases the location may already be present because of the camera’s GPS activation OR our integration with your agency’s CAD system.  Either way, having location data is valuable when running reports, searching for video at a specific location and even analytics.  One of our next releases will include the ability to draw a GEO fence around a location and see all of the recordings in that designated area.

Location Based Evidence Gathering is also a great tool when used in conjunction with our Karma UAV.

Find Out More


Intrensic User’s Group

August 1,2017
intrensic gopro

Welcome to the Intrensic User’s Group. Our support and development team will send out routine emails to our Body Worn Camera users that includes exciting new features, tips for easy navigation and solicitations for future developments. We appreciate your feedback and we are always here to help.  To stay in the loop, submit the form below:

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required


Newsletter: May 9, 2017

May 9,2017


Body Camera Reporting, Auditing Features Push Intrensic to the Forefront

May 5,2017

Washington, DC, May 3, 2017 (Newswire) –As Intrensic closes the gap on its development of both a Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) and a Records Management (RMS) platform, a newly released feature in their Digital Evidence Management System (DEMS) has catapulted them ahead of the competition.

With terabytes of video uploaded to the cloud in only months, the ability to audit a body camera program is essential. While Intrensic has arguably the most detailed audit trail in the business by capturing every file touch down to the IP address, date and time is just not enough.

“We saw the need to create a report that would allow a patrol supervisor or body camera program manager to audit video uploads versus an officer’s number of calls,” said Director of Product Development Kevin AngellAngell said he realized the need for the report when presenting at a national conference to community organizations and special interests groups.

Following that meeting, Angell met with CEO Kevin Mullins and discussed the creation of an Upload Audit Report (UAR). The report would be able to be run by supervisors daily, weekly, monthly or on a customized set of dates. It would include the number of uploads on a specific date and could be exported as a PDF report.

“We knew that with the UAR in hand, a supervisor could call dispatch or run a call log and ensure the integrity of their program by comparing uploads to calls,” said Mullins.  Mullins immediately sent the feature to the development team for research.

The UAR is not the only reporting feature developed during the recent roll-out, but Mullins held his cards close. When pressed Mullins said, “Crime reporting to the FBI, predictive patrolling and grant reporting were as important to us as they were to our clients.”

The Bureau of Justice Assistance (Washington, DC), their Body Worn Camera toolkit and the Training and Technical Assistance (TTA) program provide some additional insight into the future needs of agencies and body-worn camera programs. Angell remarked that he is in a constant “read and research mode” to ensure that Intrensic stays ahead of the curve. “We really hit the ball out of the park this time,” he said. “I am not aware of any other body-worn camera provider with such a report,” he added, referring to the UAR.

Once the CAD and RMS platforms roll out later this year, the UAR will go hand in hand with several other reports, thereby freeing up officers to engage the community and build relationships.